Stem cells injected into damaged tissue replicate almost any type of cell needed by the body to regenerate.

We offer stem cell injections that promote healing from within the body. As an alternative to the recovery time and side effects of surgery and medications, we attempt to help the body regenerate itself. Umbilical cord Stem cells are multipotent, which means they are able to act like other cells in the body to successfully repair damage such as degenerative arthritis, tendon and ligament damage, and joint pain. Containing anti-inflammatory properties, and hyaluronic acid which lubricate joints and tendons, they also provide pain relief while restoring tissue. Tissue regeneration is helped by the mix of cells,electrolytes, growth factors,carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, enzymes, and other hormones present in the amniotic fluid. These components work together at the site of injury so new cells can form, and the injured tissue can be repaired, remodeled, and rebuilt back to its normal state.

 

What Are Umbilical Cord Stem Cells & Where Do They Come From?

Umbilical cord stem cells are obtained from healthy donors who have volunteered to donate their umbilical cord after undergoing elective caesarian delivery. The umbilical cord is collected at several facilities around the country, following strict guidelines. The donors are between 18 and 35 years old, are healthy, and have no prior use of medication or other chemical substances. A careful history is taken regarding their social life, as well as their medical history. Their blood is tested for communicable diseases. At the time of their caesarian delivery, the baby is delivered healthy and the umbilical cord is aseptically. The tissues are tested to ensure viability and safety. The tissues are processed to the highest standards in a state of the art AATB accredited facility. AATB and FDA rules and regulations are strictly adhered to ensure safety of the tissues before it is released for use.

 

BENEFITS INCLUDE:

Pain relief, due anti-inflammatory properties including cytokines.
New tissue growth and repair.
New cartilage regeneration and lubrication.
Prevent further cartilage damage without the use of steroids.
With umbilical cordstem cells, there is no immune system rejection.
Better healing potential due to higher concentration of umbilical cord stem cells versus embryonic stem cells and the patients own stem cells( from fat or bone marrow).

 

ARE STEM CELL INJECTIONS SAFE?

Yes. More than 10,000 injections have been performed without a single reported adverse side effect.

Umbilical cord stem cell therapy is a preferred type of stem cell therapy because the cells come from an immunoprivileged site, which means that the patient-rejection is extremely rare.
The use of umbilical cord stem cells is well researched, safe, and effective. Amniotic stem cells have been used by ophthalmologists and plastic surgeons for about 20 years.
All umbilical cord cell donors go through a rigourous screening process, as determined by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and American Association of Tissue Banks (AATB).

 

Intra-articular injection of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: a proof-of-concept clinical trial.

Jo CH1, Lee YG, Shin WH, Kim H, Chai JW, Jeong EC, Kim JE, Shim H, Shin JS, Shin IS, Ra JC, Oh S, Yoon KS.

Author Information

ERRATUM IN

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to have a potential for articular cartilage regeneration. However, most studies focused on focal cartilage defect through surgical implantation. For the treatment of generalized cartilage loss in osteoarthritis, an alternative delivery strategy would be more appropriate. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of intra-articular injection of autologous adipose tissue derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) for knee osteoarthritis. We enrolled 18 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee and injected AD MSCs into the knee. The phase I study consists of three dose-escalation cohorts; the low-dose (1.0 × 10(7) cells), mid-dose (5.0 × 10(7)), and high-dose (1.0 × 10(8)) group with three patients each. The phase II included nine patients receiving the high-dose. The primary outcomes were the safety and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included clinical, radiological, arthroscopic, and histological evaluations. There was no treatment-related adverse event. The WOMAC score improved at 6 months after injection in the high-dose group. The size of cartilage defect decreased while the volume of cartilage increased in the medial femoral and tibial condyles of the high-dose group. Arthroscopy showed that the size of cartilage defect decreased in the medial femoral and medial tibial condyles of the high-dose group. Histology demonstrated thick, hyaline-like cartilage regeneration. These results showed that intra-articular injection of 1.0 × 10(8) AD MSCs into the osteoarthritic knee improved function and pain of the knee joint without causing adverse events, and reduced cartilage defects by regeneration of hyaline-like articular cartilage.

KEYWORDS:

Adipose-tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells; Cartilage regeneration; Intra-articular injection; Osteoarthritis

Intra-articular injection of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: a proof-of-concept clinical trial.

Jo CH1, Lee YG, Shin WH, Kim H, Chai JW, Jeong EC, Kim JE, Shim H, Shin JS, Shin IS, Ra JC, Oh S, Yoon KS.

AUTHOR INFORMATION

ERRATUM IN

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to have a potential for articular cartilage regeneration. However, most studies focused on focal cartilage defect through surgical implantation. For the treatment of generalized cartilage loss in osteoarthritis, an alternative delivery strategy would be more appropriate. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of intra-articular injection of autologous adipose tissue derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) for knee osteoarthritis. We enrolled 18 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee and injected AD MSCs into the knee. The phase I study consists of three dose-escalation cohorts; the low-dose (1.0 × 10(7) cells), mid-dose (5.0 × 10(7)), and high-dose (1.0 × 10(8)) group with three patients each. The phase II included nine patients receiving the high-dose. The primary outcomes were the safety and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included clinical, radiological, arthroscopic, and histological evaluations. There was no treatment-related adverse event. The WOMAC score improved at 6 months after injection in the high-dose group. The size of cartilage defect decreased while the volume of cartilage increased in the medial femoral and tibial condyles of the high-dose group. Arthroscopy showed that the size of cartilage defect decreased in the medial femoral and medial tibial condyles of the high-dose group. Histology demonstrated thick, hyaline-like cartilage regeneration. These results showed that intra-articular injection of 1.0 × 10(8) AD MSCs into the osteoarthritic knee improved function and pain of the knee joint without causing adverse events, and reduced cartilage defects by regeneration of hyaline-like articular cartilage.

KEYWORDS:

Adipose-tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells; Cartilage regeneration; Intra-articular injection; Osteoarthritis

COMMENT IN

Arthroscopy. 2013 Apr;29(4):684-94. doi: 10.1016/j.arthro.2012.12.008. Epub 2013 Feb 4.

Articular cartilage regeneration with autologous peripheral blood stem cells versus hyaluronic acid: a randomized controlled trial.

Saw KY1, Anz A, Siew-Yoke Jee C, Merican S, Ching-Soong Ng R, Roohi SA, Ragavanaidu K.

Author Information

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to compare histologic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of articular cartilage regeneration in patients with chondral lesions treated by arthroscopic subchondral drilling followed by postoperative intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) with and without peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC).

METHODS:

Fifty patients aged 18 to 50 years with International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade 3 and 4 lesions of the knee joint underwent arthroscopic subchondral drilling; 25 patients each were randomized to the control (HA) and the intervention (PBSC + HA) groups. Both groups received 5 weekly injections commencing 1 week after surgery. Three additional injections of either HA or PBSC + HA were given at weekly intervals 6 months after surgery. Subjective IKDC scores and MRI scans were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively at serial visits. We performed second-look arthroscopy and biopsy at 18 months on 16 patients in each group. We graded biopsy specimens using 14 components of the International Cartilage Repair Society Visual Assessment Scale II (ICRS II) and a total score was obtained. MRI scans at 18 months were assessed with a morphologic scoring system.

RESULTS:

The total ICRS II histologic scores for the control group averaged 957 and they averaged 1,066 for the intervention group (P = .022). On evaluation of the MRI morphologic scores, the control group averaged 8.5 and the intervention group averaged 9.9 (P = .013). The mean 24-month IKDC scores for the control and intervention groups were 71.1 and 74.8, respectively (P = .844). One patient was lost to follow-up. There were no notable adverse events.

CONCLUSIONS:

After arthroscopic subchondral drilling into grade 3 and 4 chondral lesions, postoperative intra-articular injections of autologous PBSC in combination with HA resulted in an improvement of the quality of articular cartilage repair over the same treatment without PBSC, as shown by histologic and MRI evaluation.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level II, randomized controlled trial (RCT).

Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

COMMENT IN

Pain Physician. 2008 May-Jun;11(3):343-53.

Increased knee cartilage volume in degenerative joint disease using percutaneously implanted, autologous mesenchymal stem cells.

Centeno CJ1, Busse D, Kisiday J, Keohan C, Freeman M, Karli D.

Author Information

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

The ability to repair tissue via percutaneous means may allow interventional pain physicians to manage a wide variety of diseases including peripheral joint injuries and osteoarthritis. This review will highlight the developments in cellular medicine that may soon permit interventional pain management physicians to treat a much wider variety of clinical conditions and highlight an interventional case study using these technologies

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if isolated and expanded human autologous mesenchymal stem cells could effectively regenerate cartilage and meniscal tissue when percutaneously injected into knees.

DESIGN:

Case Study

SETTING:

Private Interventional Pain Management practice.

METHODS:

An IRB approved study with a consenting volunteer in which mesenchymal stem cells were isolated and cultured ex-vivo from bone marrow aspiration of the iliac crest. The mesenchymal stem cells were then percutaneously injected into the subject’s knee with MRI proven degenerative joint disease. Pre- and post-treatment subjective visual analog pain scores, physical therapy assessments, and MRIs measured clinical and radiographic changes.

RESULTS:

At 24 weeks post-injection, the patient had statistically significant cartilage and meniscus growth on MRI, as well as increased range of motion and decreased modified VAS pain scores.

CONCLUSION:

The described process of autologous mesenchymal stem cell culture and percutaneous injection into a knee with symptomatic and radiographic degenerative joint disease resulted in significant cartilage growth, decreased pain and increased joint mobility in this patient. This has significant future implications for minimally invasive treatment of osteoarthritis and meniscal injury.

Pain Physician. 2006 Jul;9(3):253-6.

Partial regeneration of the human hip via autologous bone marrow nucleated cell transfer: A case study.

Centeno CJ1, Kisiday J, Freeman M, Schultz JR.

AUTHOR INFORMATION
ABSTRACT HISTORY:

This is a case report of a 64-year-old white male with a 20 year history of unilateral hip pain that had become debilitating over the last several years. On intake, Harris hip score was rated as: Pain subscale = 10, Function subscale = 32, Deformity subscale = 4, Motions subscale = 4.775 with a total score of 50.8 out of 100. MRI of the affected hip showed severe degeneration with spurring, decrease in joint space, and several large subchondral cysts. The patient had been evaluated by an orthopedic surgeon and told he was a candidate for bipolar hip replacement.

METHOD:

Two autologous nucleated cell collections were performed from bone marrow with subsequent isolation and transfers into the intra-articular hip using a hyaluronic acid and thrombin activated platelet rich plasma scaffold. Marrow samples were processed by centrifugation and lysis techniques to isolate nucleated cells.

CONCLUSION:

This report describes partial by articular surface regeneration 8 weeks after intraarticular bone marrow transfer. Post-op 3.0T FGRE MRI showed neocortex formation when compared to immediate pre-op MRI and objective improvements were noted that coincided with subjective reports of improvement.

AM I A CANDIDATE FOR STEM CELL THERAPY?

Patients suffering from any kind of joint, tendon, or ligament pain may be considered as candidates for amniotic stem cell therapy at Advanced Health Solutions. Patients with severe degenerative osteoarthritis may not be eligible for stem cell therapy. Your consultation, evaluation, and X-Rays or MRI will determine if you are a candidate.